...although admittedly not together, unless you count the way in which these two quirky news stories found themselves nestling next to each other in my inbox this evening:

First, Jez found this corking piece of reportage from The Times on Saturday:

A WOMAN who attacked her 72-year-old brother with rhubarb is facing an anti-social behaviour order after her neighbours complained.

Residents of Askrigg, a village in the Yorkshire Dales, say that Margaret Porter, 50, of nearby Newbiggin, caused “fear in the community”.

Porter assaulted her brother, William Porter, with whom she does not speak, in May last year. He had incensed her by laughing at her. She hurled three sticks of rhubarb that she was carrying at him, hitting him in the eye, which he reported to the police. Porter admitted common assault and returned to court yesterday for sentencing.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/printFriendly/0,,1-2-1440613,00.html

 

Then Rosie told me about the much-reported news that The Pentagon had considered developing chemical bombs intended to persuade enemy combatants to make love, not war (as long as they could put up with the stink):

Sky News:

 The Pentagon was considering developing a 'homosexual sex bomb' designed to make enemy troops gay, it has been revealed.      

The bomb would release a chemical aphrodisiac that would get the soldiers frisky and make them irresistible to each other.

It was hoped their "distasteful but completely non-lethal" homosexual behaviour would hit moral in the barracks, the New Scientist reports.

http://www.sky.com/skynews/article/0,,31500-13282758,00.html

BBC:

Researchers pondered a "Who? Me?" bomb, which would simulate flatulence in enemy ranks. 

Indeed, a "Who? Me?" device had been under consideration since 1945, the government papers say.

However, researchers concluded that the premise for such a device was fatally flawed because "people in many areas of the world do not find faecal odour offensive, since they smell it on a regular basis".

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/4174519.stm

 

You couldn't make this stuff up!